Boiled Sweets and Sugar Confectionery

Boiled Sweets and Sugar Confectionery

The main ingredient used – sugar – gives this product group its name. This product group also includes so-called sugar-free confectionery. This type is produced using  sugar substitutes, such as fructose, sorbitol, and xylitol.

Examples of confectionery are boiled sweets, coated sweets, fruit gums, liquorice sweets, ice chocolates, marzipan, nut brittle, praline, foamed confectionery, sherbets and drink powders, candied fruits, caramelised almonds, sugar-coated nuts.

Information on the product group Boiled Sweets and Sugar Confectionery at the BDSI is available by clicking here.

 

Frequently asked questions about Boiled Sweets and Sugar Confectionery


Which products actually count as confectionery?

This category includes products such as sweets, coated sweets, fruit gums, liquorice, ice chocolates, marzipan, nut brittle, praline, foamed confectionery, sherbets and drink powders, candied fruit, roasted almonds, and sugar-coated nuts.


How are sweets made?

The production of sweets begins with the preparation of a solution of sugar, water, glucose, and syrup. Water is removed from this solution by boiling it at temperatures of between 125 and 150° C. The residual water content determines the quality of the candy. So-called hard caramels, for example, have a residual water content of around 3%, while soft caramels have a residual water content of as much as around 10%. Residual water content determines the different “textures” of the sweet. Hard caramels, for example, are a product intended more for sucking in the mouth, whereas soft caramels are more for chewing. Addtives determing value and taste, such as milk, cream, honey, chocolate, nuts, vitamins, flavourings, and colourings are added to the sugar mass. Then follows the forming of the sweets. A distinction is made here between cut, stamped, and moulded sweets.


Where does the term “bonbon” come from?

As the story goes, the term “bonbon” originated in aristocratic circles as early as around the year 1600. In 1572, the French king Henri IV offered sweets on the occasion of his wedding. The children present are said to have been so enthusiastic about the delicacies that they shouted “Bon! Bon!”, i.e. the French word for “good” twice over, which in that repeated form then became a fixed term.

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